Street level

Although I love watching the clouds, sometimes the structures that the atmosphere comes up with are just too astonishing for anything.  I just love the cloud streets shown in this Cloud Appreciation Society newsletter.


So much science in art

My beginning students learn that there is a lot of science in art.  This is an old article but I kept it to reblog:  A neuroscientist working in an art museum.  I was prompted to blog it today after having a conversation yesterday with a lady who had just completed her masters in psychology and was hoping to consult in the corporate world, rather than enter private medical practice, and to incorporate art into her work.  Maybe we’ll work together on something…..

Ah, back on the map, and travelling around it.

So often, Wales get bundled in with England.  I was glad to see that CNN reported the correct geography on this article about hydrogen cars.  We Welsh aren’t noted for engineering like some other countries, but there is a lot of green in the landscape….

Sonnet Challenge #16

Quiver of Quotes came up with some interesting little used words, that piqued my interest for continuing the stream of sonnets.  The flow had taken a break after having finally surpassed (in numbers at least) Shakespeare’s collection.  Here was the one that came to fruition from The Quote’s list.  And thank you as ever to for giving me enough material!

Armillary Sphere

The mystery of an armillary sphere!

How does it work?  How does it turn around?

Rings built to represent what hangs in air,

or how it is positioned from the ground.

I wonder at the workings of the mind

that dreamed up such an engineering feat;

Ptolemaic turns on earth defined,

Copernican with sun at center seat.

Mankind has realized since he looked up

that stars revolve across the deep blue night

and puzzled at the turnings of this cup

and with the armil, tried to show it right.

Stargazers wonder at the skies so clear,

then track it with an armillary sphere.

There’s so much science in art.

Recently my other half asked me ‘What’s the deal behind the phrase “As mad as a hatter”?’

Well, he was asking the right person, I actually know the answer.  Years back when hatters where hatters, mercury was used in the process of hat making.  So this was all before people knew that mercury wasn’t good to handle and lick your fingers after, get it on your skin and such.  So hatters would handle mercury and get mercury poisoning, which would become evident in them going nuts.  Hence the phrase, as mad as a hatter!

In a similar vein, here are some of the nasty things that artists – or art handlers – have to take risks with.

As I say to my students.  Once you get the temptation to lick your brush, wash your brush in your wine or drink it after, remember that one of those pigments might be phthaloCYANINE blue.

Collapse of an eco-system and the last superhero.


I’m not usually an openly political person – this is something of a political posting, but more of an ecological item, not party politics.  If you live anywhere in North or Central America, this could affect you.

Monthly Newsletter


The balloon of knowledge….

Here’s November’s monthly newsletter.  As an addendum, I realize I was actually working on 25 commissions in October.  When do I find time to clean the house?  Oh, wait……