Tales from the field #17

There are many challenges that the art fair artist experiences.
Usually the worst is weather. Sometimes it’s as distressing as the porta potty company letting us down on the delivery on Friday night and we arrived on Saturday needing to cross our legs until a rescue company arrived at 9:30.

Sometimes it’s a simple as needing to squeeze an old ambulance into a compact space.

Ambulance squeezed into compact parking space

I think they fudged a little on the other side.

And I thought I was doing well to get the Silverado in a compact space without dinging the van on one side and the shiny Tesla on the other!

Advertisements

New artwork on Society6

Mixed media painting

#1220 Theme and Variations. Mixed media on wood. 17″. $230

I just posted “Theme and Variations” on Society6.com this morning.  You can now get this on quite a variety of items.  I personally like it on the tote bag, though its shape is perfect for the clock and stools that they do.

Last month I put up variations on the “One Side” artwork in different languages.  This Link should hopefully take you there, otherwise go to society6.com and search for ‘One Side’.  It comes up among other unrelated images.  If you like it but want it in your language, let me know.  If you’re a fluent speaker on some of the non-English versions and I haven’t done a good job of the translation – let me know, I can fix it!

Let me know if you’re thinking about ordering anything from my Society6.com store – I frequently get discounts sent to me and would be happy to pass them along to you.

 

 

Tales from the field #15

This past weekend I was at the Art in the Park in Boulder City, NV – the fair is a fundraiser for the local hospital.  As usual, I know a bunch of the artists there.  John Conroy was next to me, Bob Marble was across from me, Dominique Blanchard was catty corner from him two spaces in front of me and behind John was Mario Cespedes.  On the row behind Mario were Bob and Nancy Lynn.  Perhaps they figure it’s a good idea to put all the Californians together.

On the Sunday morning it rained and the crowds were a little thin to start off, but I guess everyone decided it was worth coming out for and the crowds picked up in the afternoon.  In a quiet moment I stepped into John’s booth to ask him something – a lady came in the booth from the other direction clutching a couple of Mario’s works.  She asked us – are either of you the artists for this booth?  No – but we’ll look for him, we know what he looks like.

Mario is nowhere near.

This lady’s friends are anxious to get going – Mario doesn’t have any business cards in his booth to call him to come back, and although he has a credit card machine, it’s not one I know how to work.  Nancy and Bob start looking for Mario also.  The lady’s friends agree to let her catch up with them.  I looked in my cell phone and I surprise, have a number for Mario – it’s a San Francisco number, but he wouldn’t be the only person I know whith a cell# that doesn’t match their current location – so I called him.  “Hey, you have a client in your booth, where are you?”  “I’ll be right back.”  and he hangs up.  I find a receipt book and start writing up the receipt for her.  Then Mario calls.

At this point I realize it’s Mario the photographer who lives in San Francisco.  Somewhere out there, he’s at another art fair, and was away from his booth when I called. Unable to explain in great detail in front of the increasingly anxious client, she manages to find enough cash to do the deal, I give her the receipt and off she goes.

Another lady who was sitting on a bench across from Mario’s booth, waiting for her husband has been watching this whole thing unfold.  She offers to sit in Mario’s booth and direct potential clients to me so I don’t have to abandon my own store, or to Nancy.  What an angel!  Half an hour later we still haven’t found Mario, no one has a number for him.  Went over to the organizers who agreed to call him, but at that point he turned up.  Seems like when he went to get in line to buy some popcorn, half the people at the show decided to get in line in front of him.

Oh well, at least he didn’t lose the sale.

Hermosa Beach

Saturday night’s reception was quite a change from the previous night in Temecula.  It was the hopping place to be.  We had about 30 artists showing work and a lot of supporters.  The theme of the show was ‘Indivisible’.  Rafael McMaster, our leader at Hermosa Beach Artist Collective had designed a logo to embody this:  Create a division sign, then put an x through it.  There were a couple blank canvases on the wall next to the door and everyone was encouraged to ‘make their mark’!

Despite the quality of the artwork, I think I was the only artist whose artwork embodied the theme of the show.  Not sure if it was good or bad that a couple people commented that they thought my painting, behind the desk which functions as the bar during receptions, was the logo for the show.  Hmm.  Comments encouraged.  One of the things that I like about my painting, “One Side“, originally designed for entry into a competition on art to promote world peace, is that I could photoshop the saying in any language for reproductions.

One Side painting

“One Side” behind the desk/bar at HBAC

 

Indivisible

This weekend I will have a painting in the Hermosa Beach Artist Collective gallery for the “Indivisible” show.  The reception is 4-9, if you are in the area, or wish to forward this to someone you know who is.

INDIVISIBLE latest for FB[54678].png

Tales from the field #12

This little tale isn’t really about art fairs or galleries – but it was kind of in a field, and tickled my silly sense of humor to the extent that I wanted to share.  Last weekend D and I spent some time at Lake Cuyamaca.  One of my favorite activities is to walk across the top end of the lake, next to the meadow, over towards the forest.  From there, there are a lot of options for wandering and discovering nature.

Talking of nature, there’s a last-chance for the call of nature before you set off.

porta potty

I just love the half moon over the door.

But let’s take a closer look at that sign.  It isn’t a man, or a woman or even a disabled sign (not that this particular potty could accommodate a wheelchair, but the path leading to it wouldn’t be easy for a wheelchair anyway).  It’s a white label that’s peeled off into the shape of someone taking a seat!

porta potty sign

Just in case you were unsure what this room was for.

Sonnet Challenge #27

I realized that I had not posted this sonnet, despite the fact that it was inspired by the experience of a fellow blogger.  Rhi had gone for a very important interview and had asked for some accommodations to help with the difficulties with environment unfamiliarity due to autism.  They guessed at how they needed to overcome her difficulties and did not succeed too much.  Perhaps as a consequence, neither did she at securing the job.  I recommend you read her blog entry before you read the sonnet.

A day in your moccasins

We able-bodied try to understand
the difficulties of the body bent
into a chair, or missing foot or hand
by hobbling ourselves, with the intent
of walking in your shoes – or wheels – or world
of silence. We can don masks, hold a cane,
experience the perspective of hands curled
to uselessnes by age’s creeping pain.
This path we walked can help us build a bridge
across the chasms that hold back those not whole;
and yet one group we still leave on the edge
unable to feel how you’re untypical.
We can’t take steps inside a spectrum mind.
Only see footprints in the sand you left behind.