Zooming back

Have been away for awhile so no blogging.  This time that I flew to Heathrow, I took United, so I ended up in Terminal 2, whereas it seems just about every other airline that flies out of LA uses Terminal 3.  So, on the way home, I had time to seek out some of the artwork at this terminal.  Slipstream is a huge sculpture that occupies a massive covered area between the terminal and the buses/taxis area.

aluminum sculpture slipstream

“Slipstream”

The associated sign says a little more about it, and there’s yet more information here.  I don’t see any information about material, but it seems to be made of aluminum.  Or aluminium, if you use the local dialect. Sadly, despite the enticing shape, we’re not apparently allowed to slide on it.

slipstream_sign_w

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Graphene

Concrete is the most commonly used building material in the world. And now, by adding the invisible wonder material graphene to it, researchers have taken a step towards a more sustainable construction industry. The new graphene-laced concrete is two times as strong and four times as water-resistant as the standard stuff, shows a new study…

via Graphene Can Green Up Concrete’s Act — Anthropocene

 

Messing about in boats

I have to say that this was one painting (or pair of paintings) executed under the most hostile of weathers.  No, not so much heat, but the desiccating wind.  I had to stop on the second morning and go back for a short session closer to dawn on the third day, and then it was a struggle.  The good news is that once I’d drawn up the letters, I could quickly go from one side to the other, painting layers, knowing full well that that my start point would be completely dry by the time I returned to it in about 25 minutes.  At the end of the second day I had to quit because the paint was drying on the brush.  The east side of the boat was too hot to work, and the west side, in the shade and wind, I was shivering.  And I still had to figure out how to spray with an acrylic glaze with the UV component – in a stiff breeze.

Nevertheless ‘Poseidon’ has its name on its sides and today will be test launched.  Eventually this boat will carry a solar powered pump which will pump water from the Salton Sea into the marina ‘fingers’ in Desert Shores, to maintain the water level and mitigate red agae.  Launch day is on Sunday.

starboard_finished

port_finished

I would like to recommend….

For those of you who are into science – at least reading about it – can I recommend this blog – sciencesprings. Richard posts a lot of interesting science stuff from earth and around the universe.

From Science Alert: “This Volcano Erupted For 5 Years Straight, And The Photos Are Mesmerising” — sciencesprings

Science Alert 5 APR 2018 SIGNE DEAN You’re looking at a very rare type of lava fountain. (USGS) On 24 May 1969, a deep rumbling started within Kīlauea, the largest of the volcanoes comprising the island of Hawai’i. Looking up the slope of Kilauea, a shield volcano on the island of Hawaii. In the foreground, […]

via From Science Alert: “This Volcano Erupted For 5 Years Straight, And The Photos Are Mesmerising” — sciencesprings

Indio Chalk Festival, Day 4 – the results

It didn’t rain at my house overnight on Saturday. However when I got to Indio, I found that there had been two hours of steady good rain there. Ugh. The city people had gotten there a little earlier and removed all the tarps to let the paintings dry. They needed to be dry before we could start on repair work, so we had a little time to commiserate between each other before we could start. Rafael’s painting – Lincoln, and Bijan’s painting (we think we read each others’ minds when we came up with such similar design ideas) had the most damage.

Indio Chalk Festival

Some damage to the right hand corners and both hands that required a little rework. The throat dried out fine. The wash marks on the ocean wrist I just incorporated.

Indio Chalk Festival

There were still puddles around 9:30am

Indio Chalk Festival

Lincoln needed a nose job.

Indio Chalk Festival

Bijan’s tarp leaked, causing a lot of damage on the neck and into the clouds.

Indio Chalk Festival

Repair work done, just in time for the judging. Except that about 2 minutes before Kathy came by, a woman let her 3 year old run through the painting. Then yelled at me for chiding him!

Indio Chalk Festival

The last competitor finished later in the day.

Amateur entries continued throughout the day, to the extent that there was so much judging for Kathy Dunham to do that the awards ceremony was about 40 minutes late. Here were the results in the professional category. The prizes were $2,500, $1,500 and $1,000.

1. Bijan Masoumpaneh
2. Rafael Valencia
3. Jeni Bate

Indio Chalk Festival

The artist as part of the environment. 8’x8′, chalk on blacktop. (Photoshopped to be vertical, though you can possibly now see some of the foot damage.)

 

Indio Chalk Festival, Day 2.

I’ll just post the pics to show the progress.  It’s hard to type, my fingers are so sore and rough!

Indio Chalk Festival

About 11am 350 fellow chalkers arrived from local schools. These are just a few of them.

Indio Chalk Festival

One of the city photographers was kind enough to take a pic of me working on my phone.

Indio Chalk Festival

The trees/fingers and veins/rivers are now complete.

Indio Chalk Festival

Underpainting for the ocean.

Indio Chalk Festival

Ocean/hand complete with waves rushing to shore/shoulder. I used one crack in the blacktop as the area behind a wave in order to minimize the impact. Couldn’t think of how to do anything with the others.

Indio Chalk Festival

I started adding the hair/sky/space at the bottom, but then clouds came and I decided to take advantage and work on the top of the painting, as I can’t shade that part with the canopy.

Indio Chalk Festival

Yellow on top, black/blue under and sore underneath that.

Indio Chalk Festival

An inspector came by.

Indio Chalk Festival

I decided to end the day by blocking in the transitions of the sunrise part of the hair as a guide for tomorrow.