Preserving public art in a city of earthquakes — thinking city

Quote

Mexico City’s public art is an integral part of the city’s identity and history. But in a country prone to devastating earthquakes, what is the fate of these creative monuments, asks Martha Pskowski – and is meaningful preservation possible? Mexico City is a bastion of public art in the Americas, with murals, mosaics and monuments lining its […]

via Preserving public art in a city of earthquakes — thinking city //

Gallery sitting

Yesterday I was a gallery docent and gift store clerk at the 29 Palms Art Gallery in – guess where – 29 Palms!
I had a solo show there a couple years ago and this time I entered a painting into the annual membership show. One of the requirements is to gallery sit for a day so off I went.

29Palms Art Gallery Membership show

Something looks familiar here

I’d not gallery sat here before so there was a bit of a learning curve, but there was good documentation for new and rusty docents to follow. When I arrived, a group of the board were doing some envelope stuffing for membership renewals, so I was able to help out there too. Many of the board members stayed through part of my day so I had help.
And I needed it. I had a couple who went into the gift store and chose something to purchase. I had been shown the ropes a little regarding the iPad with the Square on it, and read the manual, but was not prepared for the fact the iPad wouldn’t turn on. It turned out to be a faulty socket where it was plugged in!
There were inevitably a lot of questions I couldn’t answer, but a few that I could. By the end of the afternoon I was a lot more confident of the next time I’m going to be there.

29Palms Membership show artwork

Member’s artwork in the Membership show

The pics are of the membership show in the central gallery. There was also a historical show in the main gallery and a solo show in the west gallery – along with no information about the artists, Reuven Wallach, which didn’t help!
Sorry I didn’t get the pic of the third wall of the membership show, a gallery visitor walked in at that point, then we were busy until closing time.

Humans vs Neanderthals

Here’s an interesting article from just over a month ago about how Humans may have had the edge over Neanderthals.

Not far on its heels came this article about Neanderthal art.  I guess some aspects of art history will remain a mystery, at least for a little while.

Mixed media

Who knew that Vincent van Gogh was a mixed media artist?  Turns out that he incorporated some unusual components in his work.  It is know that he liked very much to paint en plein aire, so it’s actually not that much of a surprise that he incorporated wildlife into his paintings, along with dust and sand.

The Pylos Combat Agate.

I thought that this article was very interesting.  About 3500 years ago, a Minoan warrior was buried along with some stone carved artwork.  Now that it’s been unearthed, the details in the artwork suggest a level of artistic knowledge beyond its time.

It is certainly a detailed piece of realistic carving!

 

Munch’s colors

I thought This Article about Edward Munch’s color theory was really interesting.  Red is interpreted more quickly by the brain than blue because the wavelengths are slower!

And the quote “Quantum mechanics has been very well correlated with the emergence of non-representational art.” – Bober – shows you just how much science there is in art.  So if you want to be an artist, don’t skip chemistry or subatomic physics in school.

An art book with a difference

This is definitely an art book with a difference:  “La mia idea de arte.” Pope Francis’s ideas about art.

One idea, quoted in an Artnet article:

“The Vatican Museums have to be the most beautiful place and the most hospitable. It must throw open its doors to the world,” wrote the Pope in his book, noting that based on the teaching of the Bible, the poor’s inability to pay should not prevent them from seeing the church’s impressive art collection.

The book, co-written with Tiziana Lupi is also now a documentary, apparently available on youtube.  The book doesn’t seem to be available (bummer).