Munch’s colors

I thought This Article about Edward Munch’s color theory was really interesting.  Red is interpreted more quickly by the brain than blue because the wavelengths are slower!

And the quote “Quantum mechanics has been very well correlated with the emergence of non-representational art.” – Bober – shows you just how much science there is in art.  So if you want to be an artist, don’t skip chemistry or subatomic physics in school.

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Global warming and art

There’s something to be said about global warming – like ‘it’s real!!!!’ – when even art museums are changing the way they choose and store art because of it.  I found this article very interesting.  Maybe art that is destroyed when it becomes too wet is going to be ‘ephemeral art’ in the not too distant future.  Perhaps I should start sculpting in stone…..

YInMn Blue

For those of you who have taken my Painting for Absolute Beginner’s class, you will have heard me talk about the origins of French Ultramarine.

Recently, there was another blue discovered.  Or perhaps you could call it invented, I guess it’s unclear as to whether this blue would ever occur in nature.  Personally I think it should either just be Yinmn blue, as everyone is calling it now, or Mas blue, after the original chef.  What do you think?

I’m looking forward to it being available in watercolor, acrylic and oil.

So space vs atmosphere. But it’s all sky!

The Fédération Aéronautique Internationale has demarcated the Karman Line – which lies at an altitude of 100 kilometers (330,000 feet; 62 miles) above the Earth’s sea level – as the boundary where space begins. But, NASA spokesperson Dan Huot explains from a physical science’s perspective that “there is no hard-definable point where space begins; the atmosphere…

via Where Does Space Actually Start? — Sparkonit

Painters to get a little greener.

Three things I tell my students, is that it is important to not lick your brush, drink the paint water or to wash the brush out in your wine (/coffee).  Primarily this is because of the heavy metals in some of the pigments.  Flake white was stopped being produced when it was discovered that lead isn’t good to eat. Cadmium isn’t terribly good for the digestive system either, but it is a metal that produces awesome reds and yellows from different salts; my chemistry doesn’t stretch to complete comprehension of the quinacridone range, but when you know that phthalo (you pronounce it ‘thallow’ – isn’t English wonderful!) blue’s full name is phthalocyanine blue, you might get a hint as to why brush licking isn’t advised.

But science comes to the rescue of art with replacement colors for the cadmium range that don’t contain the nasty wonderful cadmium! Liquitex isn’t my usual brand, but if Golden haven’t started introducing them by the time I’ve used all the cadmiums I currently have, I’ll definitely be giving them a try.  Looks like this is only for acrylics at the moment, but something like this will likely catch on once the ban on cadmiums can be enforced because there’s a viable alternative.

Until I’ve completed the move to cadmium-free cadmiums though, don’t lick my paintings either.