Indio Senior Center Solo Show

I have a solo show at the Indio Senior Center for the month of November.  You can drop by and see it even if you’re not a senior!  It’s on the wall of the hallway to the left of the reception desk.

Jeni Bate refractured watercolors and mixed media paintings at Indio Senior Center

Nine paintings at the Indio Senior Center

Jeni Bate refractured watercolors and mixed media paintings at Indio Senior Center

From the other direction

indiosenctr3

Jeni Bate refractured watercolors and mixed media paintings at Indio Senior Center

Director Nancy Vance took a pic of me with them. Yaay, it’s cool enough now to be not wearing shorts and a tank top!

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Sonnet Challenge #19

chalking on curb

Lost and found!

At the chalking festival, I had a lot of spare time on Sunday, sitting next to my creation and talking to people.  Across the street from me a couple of youngsters drew the above in the gutter and against the curb.  Inspiration indeed!

Draw your lost things.

Draw your lost things, there upon the street:

Your heart, your head, your homework, or the key.

A part of life suddenly incomplete.

Oh things! you think, oh please come back to me!

You rack your brain for where they’re left behind,

the cafe or the office or the car.

You look and look and still you cannot find

but that they’re not the same place that you are.

You turn over a glass, a wish to make,

but still your precious things eludes your grasp.

Were they stolen?  Did they evaporate?

You cannot think of who else you could ask.

Your lost things’ minds might try to draw you too,

thus wishing might just draw them back to you.

 

Indio Chalk Festival, Day 4 – the results

It didn’t rain at my house overnight on Saturday. However when I got to Indio, I found that there had been two hours of steady good rain there. Ugh. The city people had gotten there a little earlier and removed all the tarps to let the paintings dry. They needed to be dry before we could start on repair work, so we had a little time to commiserate between each other before we could start. Rafael’s painting – Lincoln, and Bijan’s painting (we think we read each others’ minds when we came up with such similar design ideas) had the most damage.

Indio Chalk Festival

Some damage to the right hand corners and both hands that required a little rework. The throat dried out fine. The wash marks on the ocean wrist I just incorporated.

Indio Chalk Festival

There were still puddles around 9:30am

Indio Chalk Festival

Lincoln needed a nose job.

Indio Chalk Festival

Bijan’s tarp leaked, causing a lot of damage on the neck and into the clouds.

Indio Chalk Festival

Repair work done, just in time for the judging. Except that about 2 minutes before Kathy came by, a woman let her 3 year old run through the painting. Then yelled at me for chiding him!

Indio Chalk Festival

The last competitor finished later in the day.

Amateur entries continued throughout the day, to the extent that there was so much judging for Kathy Dunham to do that the awards ceremony was about 40 minutes late. Here were the results in the professional category. The prizes were $2,500, $1,500 and $1,000.

1. Bijan Masoumpaneh
2. Rafael Valencia
3. Jeni Bate

Indio Chalk Festival

The artist as part of the environment. 8’x8′, chalk on blacktop. (Photoshopped to be vertical, though you can possibly now see some of the foot damage.)

 

Indio Chalk Festival, Day 3.

I awoke to a cloudy sky.  There had been a forecast of possible overnight rain, and I had put a tarp over my painting, though it was not big enough and I could only tarp about 60% of the finished part.  As I was starting to get ready to leave, it started to rain.  There wasn’t any time in which to hurry any faster.  It rained a little as I drove the 40 miles to Indio.  When I got there, Mamun (the city planner) was walking out to the parking lot.  He said to me ‘It rained hard here overnight, it’s a disaster, it’s all gone.’  $%&#$%^. Then he confessed he was joking.  $%&#$%^, Mamun!

We did have some sprinkles during the day, much of the morning I had most of my work tarped, even under the canopy.  It cleared up in the afternoon, though there is still a forecast of rain overnight.    Here’s the progress.

Indio Chalk Festival

Some clouds and a bit of space going in.

Indio Chalk Festival

All the sky is done now.

Indio Chalk Festival

Here come the clouds – in more ways than one.

Indio Chalk Festival

I’m hiding it from the rain here, some is blowing in under the canopy.

Indio Chalk Festival

Space is finished, now to add space objects.

Indio Chalk Festival

All done except for those cracks I found I can fill with chalk easily

Indio Chalk Festival

Some of the crowds, some of the clouds. It actually got a lot** busier than this, but I was busy at that time.

Indio Chalk Festival

Totally finished. “The artist as part of the environment”. 8’x8′, chalk on blacktop.

Let’s go check out some of the competition.

Indio Chalk Festival

Competitor 1

Indio Chalk Festival

Competitor 2

Indio Chalk Festival

Competitor 3

Indio Chalk Festival

Competitor 4

Indio Chalk Festival

Competitor 5

Indio Chalk Festival

Competitor 6

Indio Chalk Festival

Competitor 7

Indio Chalk Festival

Competitor 8

Judging is at noon tomorrow, but we have to be done by 10am.

 

Indio Chalk festival, Day 1.

I spent much of the day folded up on Miles Ave in Indio, wearing out my fingerprints, making my knees and hips sore, and straining my back.  This is for a big competition.  Well, big for me, anyway.  I’ll let the pictures paint the thousand words as my fingers are sore from rubbing chalk into the blacktop.

Chalk festival entry progress

Chalk festival entry progress

Here we go!

Chalk festival entry progress

Laying the grid to guide my outline

Chalk festival entry progress

The outline

Chalk festival entry progress

This is what it’s called

Chalk festival entry progress

I look like Darth Vader at this point

Chalk festival entry progress

Progress on the face

Chalk festival entry progress

Face and neck mostly done

Chalk festival entry progress

More corrections on the face. Being faceblind isn’t easy – I think** it kinda** looks like me, but I’m not sure.

Chalk festival entry progress

The waterfall on the left of the face, and the sky in between

Chalk festival entry progress

The field is in. I’m not entirely happy with this part and might rework it later.

Chalk festival entry progress

Blocking in the left hand. OK, I’m done for the day.

Fixing a box #4

Traffic Signal box mural

Top clouds going in.

Well, didn’t think I’d finish today, but I did. Put in a full two hours, it’s easier to work when you know that some of the traffic that’s honking is honking at you in appreciation.

Traffic Signal box mural

The north side…

And about every third person who stopped at the lights rolled down their window and said it looked great.

Traffic Signal box mural

Getting down through the cobalt. (I didn’t run out after all.)

Another local artist who also does murals in a different context stopped by to chat.

Traffic Signal box mural

It’s harder to photo this side as I’m shooting into the sun!

I did the top clouds lighter because it seems like they will fade darker anyway (comparing with photos of the original) and I knew the city planner was always a little unhappy at how dark the top came out.

Traffic Signal box mural

Tah dah!

Traffic Signal box mural

And now, the clean-up.

Fixing a box #3.

Today was the first day of color underpainting.  I’m happy that I got through it all without running out of Cobalt, but I did have to run out for Cobalt and Cadmium Yellow later as I don’t have enough for the next coat.

Traffic signal box mural

Starting to look like a mural.

I was thinking when I was painting that I should have a few business cards in my pocket, just in case.  Indeed that was true as someone did ask me for one when he was stopped at the lights.  He just pulled round the corner and we exchanged info.  Tomorrow, business cards!  (Although the conversation was useful and might end up in something further.)

Crow on light pole

Distant admirer.