A life-in-the-desert moment.

I thought for some time that the hole that was dug under the fence at the south corner of my yard was a jack-rabbit construction.  The cottontails can get through the chain fence, but not the jack-rabbits, so they would need a way of getting in if they wanted to get some water from the bottom half of the birdbath.  But I did begin to suspect that hole was rather larger than jack-rabbits needed.  I was right.

This morning I saw a coyote walking down the street outside my window. He glanced over at the birdbath and looked at the water level, then continued along the fence out of sight behind the plants. A moment later indeed he reappeared but did not initially go for a drink.

coyote in my yard

Maybe he’s curious about the movement of the blinds…

He turned and walked round the house to the west and I lost sight of him – there’s no window on that side of the house.  The pigeons, feeding at the back suddenly scattered so I knew he was close.  Went back hopefully to the bedroom window and was rewarded.  Looks like android movies upload seamlessly to Windows10, so I hope this works for you!  I wasn’t able to upload it into my post, but I was able to put it on my website: CoyoteInYard

 

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Global warming and art

There’s something to be said about global warming – like ‘it’s real!!!!’ – when even art museums are changing the way they choose and store art because of it.  I found this article very interesting.  Maybe art that is destroyed when it becomes too wet is going to be ‘ephemeral art’ in the not too distant future.  Perhaps I should start sculpting in stone…..

Silence, Trees, Weather.

Cloudy Sky

Salton City, August. Weather coming in, I hear the thunder getting closer. I hope it will clear before I go out for an arts meeting this evening!

Yes, 9 days since I blogged – I’ve been on the road for most of those.  I have seen a lot of skies, a lot of roads and was astonished by Mount Shasta – whose awesome beauty I was unprepared for.

While I was in Bellevue, WA, there was a lull at the fair, during which I was able to add to my list of sonnets.  One step further to that bucket list item.

Tree Work

The upper leaves spread up to gather light

The lower leaves reach out to seek the sun

The branches stretch and grow with all their might

Until leaves redden when the summer’s done.

The colorful flowers that bloomed bright in the spring

Are now brown crisps around a precious seed

that wait for autumn’s winds to find their wings

and fly to other grounds that might just lead

to sprouting from the earth when spring returns,

to rooting and to spreading and to growth

into a new tree; life’s desire thus burns

for life itself will not succeed with sloth.

Look at a tree and it will show you how

To plan tomorrow just by doing now.

 

The oldest studio

I always figured that the oldest known art work was the paintings on the caves at Lascaux, but it appears there is another category in the ancient art world – the studio!  Or perhaps it is best described as the paint manufacturer.  I think many people forget how much chemistry there is in art – here’s an article about some of the pigments that they worked with about 42,000 years ago.

It seems though that they hadn’t gotten into being muralists at that time, likely just body painting.  So that classifies it as time-based art.  Or beauty products…..

Destruction of art

So sad – a recent Artnet post outlining the (known) destruction of timeless art that has been lost not just to the countries where this war is, but to all humanity that appreciates it.

Summer viewing….

East Jesus Sculpture Garden in Slab City

One of the artworks at the East Jesus Sculpture Garden in Slab City (by Niland), California. Perhaps best leave this one until the fall.

Just when you thought it was safe to take a stay-cation and relax in front of the tv, ArtNet recommends a lot of travel-worthy art museums to visit.

(And just in case you were wondering, no, my refracturing technique is not a copy of David Hockney’s photo collage technique, despite some of the similarities in appearance.)

If nothing is close enough to go to, maybe there’s one closer!

 

Artwork at High Desert Medical Center

Refractured watercolor painting

#583 Sea Crest Dawn #33. Refractured watercolor on panel, 24×18″. $540.

On Friday I attended the reception for the group show at the High Desert Medical Center in Joshua Tree, California.  There are four other artists in the show, Charlie Schwartz, Sharon Matheson, Nichole Vikdal and Darlene H. Morris.  One of the interesting tidbits about this show is that they have an online store for this art, and you can click to purchase!  The downside is you cannot take the art away until the show is over at the end of July.  Oh well, anticipation can be a good thing!

We had a few snacks served and then Darlene gave the group the guided tour and we each gave a little talk about our work being shown, though Charlie wasn’t present.  Then we had an extra little celebration because Darlene is handing over the reins (no pun intended) to Raini who will be curating the shows for the foreseeable future.  This involved a cake, which had one of her paintings printed on the frosting!  Is there no limit to where you can put artwork?

If you’re in the area between now and the end of July, take a few minutes to walk through and see the work – there are brochures available throughout with information about it.