Second Place!

Before you get too excited about my achieving second place with my chalk painting last Saturday in Moreno Valley, it was a very small field of competitors.  I also had a small booth at the art fair and my beloved was being the store keeper for me, while I wore off my fingerprints.  I discovered fairly early on that our choice of space to set up (chosen because putting Doug under the tree in the shade would allow me to use the umbrella to keep the blacktop I was working on from melting my fingers), was in front of the band.  The band (there were several during the course of the day) and the between-bands background music was LOUD.  So, to relieve Doug and allow him to walk around and repair his eardrums and sanity, I hurried through my work.

The need for speed was exacerbated by wind which took the umbrella for a tumble and meant I had to chalk with one hand while quickly rubbing the chalk into the now-scorching blacktop with the other.  I finished in 2 hours, and apparently was the only one who completely finished, though other chalkers, intending to take until 4pm created larger compositions.

I had a limited amount of blue, so did the surrounding ‘atmosphere’ in red, rather than follow the original, and created far less clouds than on the mixed media painting this was based on. For this it’s more about the message than the accuracy of the map.

Chalk painting

“That the world is round reminds us that we are on the same side.”

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I would like to recommend….

For those of you who are into science – at least reading about it – can I recommend this blog – sciencesprings. Richard posts a lot of interesting science stuff from earth and around the universe.

From Science Alert: “This Volcano Erupted For 5 Years Straight, And The Photos Are Mesmerising” — sciencesprings

Science Alert 5 APR 2018 SIGNE DEAN You’re looking at a very rare type of lava fountain. (USGS) On 24 May 1969, a deep rumbling started within Kīlauea, the largest of the volcanoes comprising the island of Hawai’i. Looking up the slope of Kilauea, a shield volcano on the island of Hawaii. In the foreground, […]

via From Science Alert: “This Volcano Erupted For 5 Years Straight, And The Photos Are Mesmerising” — sciencesprings

Indio Chalk Festival, Day 3.

I awoke to a cloudy sky.  There had been a forecast of possible overnight rain, and I had put a tarp over my painting, though it was not big enough and I could only tarp about 60% of the finished part.  As I was starting to get ready to leave, it started to rain.  There wasn’t any time in which to hurry any faster.  It rained a little as I drove the 40 miles to Indio.  When I got there, Mamun (the city planner) was walking out to the parking lot.  He said to me ‘It rained hard here overnight, it’s a disaster, it’s all gone.’  $%&#$%^. Then he confessed he was joking.  $%&#$%^, Mamun!

We did have some sprinkles during the day, much of the morning I had most of my work tarped, even under the canopy.  It cleared up in the afternoon, though there is still a forecast of rain overnight.    Here’s the progress.

Indio Chalk Festival

Some clouds and a bit of space going in.

Indio Chalk Festival

All the sky is done now.

Indio Chalk Festival

Here come the clouds – in more ways than one.

Indio Chalk Festival

I’m hiding it from the rain here, some is blowing in under the canopy.

Indio Chalk Festival

Space is finished, now to add space objects.

Indio Chalk Festival

All done except for those cracks I found I can fill with chalk easily

Indio Chalk Festival

Some of the crowds, some of the clouds. It actually got a lot** busier than this, but I was busy at that time.

Indio Chalk Festival

Totally finished. “The artist as part of the environment”. 8’x8′, chalk on blacktop.

Let’s go check out some of the competition.

Indio Chalk Festival

Competitor 1

Indio Chalk Festival

Competitor 2

Indio Chalk Festival

Competitor 3

Indio Chalk Festival

Competitor 4

Indio Chalk Festival

Competitor 5

Indio Chalk Festival

Competitor 6

Indio Chalk Festival

Competitor 7

Indio Chalk Festival

Competitor 8

Judging is at noon tomorrow, but we have to be done by 10am.

 

Indio Chalk Festival, Day 2.

I’ll just post the pics to show the progress.  It’s hard to type, my fingers are so sore and rough!

Indio Chalk Festival

About 11am 350 fellow chalkers arrived from local schools. These are just a few of them.

Indio Chalk Festival

One of the city photographers was kind enough to take a pic of me working on my phone.

Indio Chalk Festival

The trees/fingers and veins/rivers are now complete.

Indio Chalk Festival

Underpainting for the ocean.

Indio Chalk Festival

Ocean/hand complete with waves rushing to shore/shoulder. I used one crack in the blacktop as the area behind a wave in order to minimize the impact. Couldn’t think of how to do anything with the others.

Indio Chalk Festival

I started adding the hair/sky/space at the bottom, but then clouds came and I decided to take advantage and work on the top of the painting, as I can’t shade that part with the canopy.

Indio Chalk Festival

Yellow on top, black/blue under and sore underneath that.

Indio Chalk Festival

An inspector came by.

Indio Chalk Festival

I decided to end the day by blocking in the transitions of the sunrise part of the hair as a guide for tomorrow.

Forever home

It’s always nice to see my work in it’s ‘forever home’.  This one is a bit special because I got to hang it myself – and it’s one of the most difficult paintings to hang because it’s not only a 4-piece painting, but because the four panels can be rotated, all the wires and hooks have to be perfectly aligned, so that when it’s changed around, there isn’t a need to make any adjustments.  Here I am with the finished installation.

Vivaldi's Window

“Vivaldi’s Window”. My concept of the one window Vivaldi may have looked out across as he wrote his most famous musical work ‘The Four Seasons’.

Cloud appreciation society letter.

I’m a member of the Cloud Appreciation Society, and sometimes we get a newsletter.  Thought I would share it HERE.

The birds know.

So this year we are forecast an El Nino.  Even before the first rain, which gave us a good inch of water a couple weeks ago, there is a shift in activity in the desert.  For many years the house finches would raise young in the nesting baskets and boxes I placed around the eaves of the house. It is such a delight to hear the twittering of open beaks insisting that they are definitely the starvingest chick in the nest and need to be the recipient of the next beakfull of food.  One year I even had a verdin build a nest in the bottom of the tiny windmill tied to my washing line.  The verdin nest is a ball of sticks with an entrance facing downwards. A few years ago, the  number of nests built dwindled noticeably and last year no chicks were raised around my house.

verdinnestsmoketree

Remodeled verdin nest in the smoke tree

This year is different.  In the wash where I frequently walk, a smoke tree which had one derelict verdin nest now has that nest remodelled, and a second one built.  And the other day, I found a verdin nest in the mesquite in the front of the yard.  I think it’s going to be a good year for rain here! [Just not on weekends, please…]

verdin nest

Verdin nest in the front mesquite