A thousand words…

A couple days ago one of my Absolute Beginners students came to the studio for some follow-up lessons.  She had been practicing in the intervening year and had also bought some books containing lessons.  They were fine books and she had learned a lot from them as you can see from the work she produced that she showed me.

Student watercolor work

Some of this students work. Yes, I know it’s a photoshop together, just couldn’t get the right angle for a table-top shot.

Nevertheless, if a picture is worth a thousand words, and a youtube video a million, then sometimes a little bit of extra in-person instruction is priceless. Sometimes I’ve shown students the difference between the brushstrokes they’re making and what they need to do to get the effect they’re aiming for by making the two types of brushstroke on their inner arm. Often it’s also picking up on the slight difference between to two in order to guide them.

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Monthly newsletter for February

Here’s what’s happened and happening at Skyscapes in February.

Student progression.

About 15 months ago, ‘Jo’ took my absolute beginner’s class.  Earlier in the month, she took the class again, not having painted very much in between.  One of the things that I ask at the beginning of the class is what the student hopes to get out of it.  It can help me tailor the class a little to hopefully cover any specific items. In this class Jo was lucky in that she was the only one, so we got to discuss her progress a little more.

She had indeed painted the day before, using watercolor crayons.  The papers were tiny piece of printer or drawing paper – not the best surface.  Jo expressed that she had had difficulty making out what she had painted afterwards and had ended up using ink to define the items painted.  Towards the end of the afternoon, after the standard Shadows exercise, we looked at Jo’s paintings and I thought we could tackle one of them as a larger watercolor and make a more realistic painting.

Working a little larger does help.  This time we used watercolor paper (Canson 140lb cold press) – about 12×9″.  I drew a quick value sketch first on a scrap to outline some of the changes that we would make to make the little barrel cacti look more round, and the rocks “rocky”.  The main adjustments were addition of shadows/shading to bring out the shapes of the cacti and rocks.  I suggested a simple blue sky/purple hills/sandy mid-ground behind the cacti in order to make them stand out from it, rather than a green one of a similar tone.  The cacti flowers didn’t come out as well as hoped – I’m not by nature a floral painter and they were a little on the small side to do much more with than a bit of impressionism.

Jo said her husband thought everything she painted was wonderful, but when he came to pick her up after the class and we showed him the before and after, there was no faking those eyebrows shooting skyward.  Here’s the before (on the right! 🙂 ) and the after.

After and before cactus paintings

Monday’s cactus painting on the right, and Tuesday’s redo with Absolute Beginners class and a little individual guidance.

Absolute Beginner’s Class

Here are some photos taken by one of the other gallerists when I was teaching in Borrego Springs Art Institute on Tuesday.  The three students, with varying levels of experience, all found they learned a lot from the class.

Jeni Bate teaching beginning painting class

Students often feel more comfortable creating a color wheel when I am too. Yes, that apron does make me look fat, doesn’t it!

Jeni Bate teaching beginning painting class

Just checking that she is painting off in the right direction. I am actually still** wearing my shorts behind the apron.

Jeni Bate teaching beginning painting class

We don’t worry about exactly evenly spaced areas, but it’s important to get the right mixes in the right places.

Newer Work #35

Dawn over Salton Sea

#1210 “Rising Peach”. Oil on gallery wrap canvas, 12×12″ $100. Currently at the Borrego Art Institute in the Summer Show which runs until October 14th.

Rising Peach is a continuation of the diagonal series.  (There are other shape series coming up…..).  Yet another beautiful dawn across the Salton Sea.  There is more hope now that these dawns will not go away too soon – or at least their reflections in the sea will not dry up, as recently President Obama announced that various agencies that can/should/will actually work together do something about the Salton Sea, rather than just spending money studying it or thinking about it.  The key part of this was the inclusion of federal agencies, I guess someone realized that this is not just an issue for Imperial and Riverside Counties.

If you can’t stand the heat…

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Three diners. One is the show curator, another a client.

…of the Colorado Desert in August, go to the kitchen.  To be precise, Kessler’s Kitchen, which is in the same building as the Borrego Art Institute in Borrego Springs, CA.  There you can dine on some delicious and very unusual pizzas and salads, and look at the four paintings by yours truly hanging on the wall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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