Monthly newsletter for February

Here’s what’s happened and happening at Skyscapes in February.

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Newer work #74

 

 

Watercolor collage painting

#1288 Let Dreams Through. Watercolor collage, 5×3.5 matted to fit 7×5″ frame.

 

Here are another couple babies from the bin.   For the first painting, I was definitely in my right brain when I was inspired to name it. On the second one, I just love the way I’ve been able to find the clouds that flow throughout the collage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Watercolor collage painting

#1289, Continuous. Watercolor collage on foamcore, 3.5×5″, matted to fit 5×7″ frame.

Newer Work #72

Mixed media painting

#1260 Nightstorm II. Mixed media on shaped solid pine panel, 24×11″. $250.

 

 

Here’s another foray into differently shaped canvases.  A very abstract piece for that slender space that just needs a pop of color.  However despite looking quite narrow, the curve means the panel is actually 11″ wide.  This is one of three ‘siblings’ made from a single 18×24″ watercolor of a starfield, but presented as a dark swirling storm.

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So space vs atmosphere. But it’s all sky!

The Fédération Aéronautique Internationale has demarcated the Karman Line – which lies at an altitude of 100 kilometers (330,000 feet; 62 miles) above the Earth’s sea level – as the boundary where space begins. But, NASA spokesperson Dan Huot explains from a physical science’s perspective that “there is no hard-definable point where space begins; the atmosphere…

via Where Does Space Actually Start? — Sparkonit

Newer Work #68

I’ve long wanted to see the Aurorae, but cost and logistics have always prevented it – plus that pesky old unalterable – the cold!  Nevertheless I can be inspired by the photos that others post.  The tough one about painting the aurorae is that it’s light on blackness – something that can’t be easily done in watercolor, and the soft swirls can’t be done easily in acrylic.  So this is one of my most impressionistic skies.

If you love it – it’s small enough to ship easily, still gift sized and ready to go on the wall.   Others that I’ve posted recently were from a batch of matted pieces.

Refractured watercolor painting

#1256 Aurorae II. Refractured watercolor on flat panel, acrylic edges. 11×14″, $180.

Forever home

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“Tranquility with tree”

Last month, from my show at 29 Palms Gallery, I sold a painting that went to its forever home in Wisconsin.  “Tranquility with Tree” has a special place in my heart – my some-times art dealer Rick Pantele and I put a 5×10 foot giclee version of it into an office at Kaiser Permanente.  Tranquility with Tree also spent about two years in the Pioneer’s Museum in Imperial.  I had stopped taking it to shows as it was my last framed piece, and the last one in a series is always the hardest one to sell.  So I was delighted it sold a couple weeks after coming out of the museum, from a gallery where it got to hang on its own little wall and didn’t stand out like a sore thumb.

foreverhome

In shipping it to Wisconsin, I got to talking to the client – whom I have not met – and he kept in touch through the reframing and sent me a picture of my baby in its Forever Home.  Then he ordered a commission painting to go with it!  The sibling went out in the mail today and I will hopefully have a portrait of the two of them together in due course.

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“Joshua Evening”

 

Newer Work #49

Mixed media painting

#1228 Morning Thermals. Mixed media on pine panel. 17″ diameter. $300

The inspiration for the shape cut and name of this painting came from my neighbor who flies a powered paraglider, and who explains the reason he usually flies around sunset.  In the earlier parts of the day, different areas of land are heating up at different rates and exuding different warmths of air, creating undulating thermals.  We all see birds soaring on the thermals – apparently it is not as easy as you think to do this, especially when your primary mechanism of staying aloft is a slice of parachute, which could luff and collapse under the wrong air temperature gradient.