Conejo Barn

On Monday I taught my regular class at the Trilogy gated community.  I caught a few students working on the last few stages of their exercises.  They all want to remain anonymous so no faces!  The last one is from one student who took it home and completed it later.

student1working

student2working

student3working

student4working

It’s easier to do those wires by painting down, rather than up.

student5complete

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A regular class

Trilogy in La Quinta is a gated community with an active creative club.  A couple months ago I got the opportunity to become one of the watercolor class instructors there, and teach about twice a month on a Monday afternoon.  It’s a guided-tuition class, a little like the paint-n-wine format in that all students complete the same painting, but with much more of a learning opportunity focus.

I get so wrapped up in demoing and guiding, that I usually forget to take photos of the class in action.  But this time, I persuaded the ladies to let me take a pic of their completed exercises to put on the blog.

Watercolor class students

Yes – they all look great!

They sure do make me work too!  Not only do I need to prepare the exercises, but I get requests of trying subjects that I don’t usually do, so my skills get stretched as a result.  Seems like we’re all having fun, though!

There’s so much science in art.

Recently my other half asked me ‘What’s the deal behind the phrase “As mad as a hatter”?’

Well, he was asking the right person, I actually know the answer.  Years back when hatters where hatters, mercury was used in the process of hat making.  So this was all before people knew that mercury wasn’t good to handle and lick your fingers after, get it on your skin and such.  So hatters would handle mercury and get mercury poisoning, which would become evident in them going nuts.  Hence the phrase, as mad as a hatter!

In a similar vein, here are some of the nasty things that artists – or art handlers – have to take risks with.

As I say to my students.  Once you get the temptation to lick your brush, wash your brush in your wine or drink it after, remember that one of those pigments might be phthaloCYANINE blue.

Colors and words.

A friend passed along this video about words for colors, and how words for colors develop in different languages.  It reminded me of a friend of mine, Gordon, with whom I was having a discussion about some coworkers who had sat across from me at a meeting wearing fuschia, chartreuse and magenta blouses which in a row, were quite visually difficult to look at!  He looked blank at me and said ‘I’m a guy, I got blue, red, green, yellow… nothing more complex than that!’

Jumping from one space to another.

The last few days have been so busy – no blogging!  I taught a class yesterday and forgot to take pictures! Ugh.  Anyway, I do have some news from the Vanguard Gallery in Moreno Valley – where I will be teaching tomorrow and Thursday.  I will try harder to remember to take photos!  You might get a preview of the show he mentions in the background.

 

The balloon of knowledge….

Here’s November’s monthly newsletter.  As an addendum, I realize I was actually working on 25 commissions in October.  When do I find time to clean the house?  Oh, wait……

Collage fun in Yucca Valley

students in watercolor collage workshop

Three having fun.

The owner of Rainbow Stew had been disappointed not to be able to attend my watercolor collage workshop when I held it January – she had had an emergency that needed to be taken care of.  So, she rescheduled the class.

Output of watercolor collage workshop

Look what we made!

A few attended the workshop last Saturday and had a great amount of fun, each making several artworks and cards.  Valerie had so much fun we promptly rescheduled for the only other mutually available weekend this year – August 19th!

Graduates of watercolor collage workshop

Can’t wait until the next class!

output of workshop

Output at higher resolution – slow load but you might be able to expand.

artwork from collage class